Referencing Information

How to reference information.

2. How do I correctly reference my work?

2.3. The Vancouver Referencing Style

Vancouver is known as a numeric referencing style, and is used in biomedical, health and some science publications.

Whenever you refer to another person’s work, you need to insert a footnote number in either superscript or in brackets in your text. For example:

Dinosaurs had to be cold blooded or they would overheat given their large body size.1

Dinosaurs had to be cold blooded or they would overheat given their large body size. (1)

This would be inserted into your reference list/bibliography as:

Spotila JR. Sea turtles: a complete guide to their biology, behaviour and conservation. Maryland: The Johns Hopkins University Press; 2004.

Authors should be cited by surname, then initials with no comma between surname and initials.

Only the first word and any proper nouns are capitalised and the title is not underlined.

The reference list/bibliography should be produced in the order you cite the works in your text, not in alphabetical order.

 

The following are some examples of how different items are referenced:

Book

Surname and initial(s) of author. Title. Place of publication: publisher; year of publication.

Spotila JR. Sea turtles: a complete guide to their biology, behaviour and conservationMaryland: The Johns Hopkins University Press; 2004.

Chapter from a multi-author book

Surname(s) and initial(s) of author(s) of the chapter. Title of chapter in single quotation marks. In name of editor(s) of book, Title of book. Place of publication: publisher; year of publication, page number(s) (preceded by p.).

Chandraharan E. 'History taking and examination in obstetrics'. In Symonds I. and Arulkumaran S., Essential Obstetrics Gynaecology. London: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2013, p. 65-77.

Journal article

Surname(s) and initial(s) of author(s) of the article. Title of article. Title of journal. Date of publication as year month day; volume (issue): page numbers (not preceded by p.).

Perry C, Barron A. Honey bees selectively avoid difficult choices. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 2013 Nov. 4; 110 (47): 19155-19159.

Website

 Author/editor. Title [Internet]. Year [date cited]. Available from: URL

Newscientist.com. Eye implant turns smartphone into a glaucoma monitor - health - 24 August 2014 - New Scientist [Internet]. 2014 [27 August]. Available from: http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn26095-eye-implant-turns-smartphone-into-a-glaucoma-monitor.html#.U_2gIBAkyuM

Live lecture

Note that the Vancouver style of referencing does not have explicit guidelines for citing an unpublished lecture; the following is therefore a suggested model.

Name of lecturer/presenter. Title of lecture. [Lecture]. Name of institution. Date.

Beeson M. The ramblings of Iain Sinclair: The persistence of the London antiquarian tradition. [Lecture]. Queen Mary University of London. 10 October 2015.


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